$0.000

Habitat Restoration

 The Black Cockatoo Conservation Centre at Kaarakin cares very much about the lost habitats of our endangered birds and wildlife.
For that reason we are involved in the restoration of habitats in our area that will provide black cockatoos with some of the nesting, feeding and roosting sites that have been taken over recent decades by the impact of humans settlement.   Land clearing, built structures and general human activity have driven the birds from their natural breeding sites and have fragmented the food sources available to them, causing stress and a greater loss of young.

Habitat Loss

Human activity has had a massive and detrimental impact on black cockatoos in recent decades… and habitat loss is the one largest contributor to the deline of the three black cockatoos species.

Eighty seven percent of the Carnabys habitat has been distroyed since the settlement of europeans with most of the wheat belt breeding range being cleared and most areas of coast plain being developed and significantly fragmented.  All that remains of substantial habitat is the thin strip of the Darling Plateau.  Do a Google-search of WA and see just how thin that strip of green is and note the brown cleared spaces either side.

The consequence of this is that the three main needs for Black Cockatoo survival have largely disappeared – feed, nesting and roosting.  And what does remain is fragmented, meaning long flights (high energy output), and reduced food supply (low intake) leading to stressed adult birds and young that simply can’t cope, struggle and die.

Habitat loss take several forms:

  1. Land clearing is perhaps that most significant and the catastrophic issue.
  2. Then there is habitat loss from invasive species of plant which change the nature of the native plant species mix.
  3. Areas of human development close by many sources make these sites undesirable to Black Cockatoos.
  4. Introduced timber plantations have cleared and replaced Black cockatoo food and nesting sites with a species that the Cockatoos cannot extract food from.
  5. Stock grazing which robs natural forest enviroments of the new seedlings and young trees that are desparately needed to replace old trees that naturally die over the course of time, leave none to grow up and replace them.

Revegetation Projects

Due to habitat loss, and therefore loss of food supply, the black cockatoos are struggling.  The BCCC is involved in the direct revegetation of 150 acres of old orchards and farmland around the centre in the Perth Hills.  The species being planted, once mature, will provide feed, nesting and roosting sites for the black cockatoo.

These projects are possible, thanks to funding support from Alcoa and SEWPAC, and also to a legion of volunteers who weed, prepare, plant, mulch and bag the trees.

Planting is done June/July whilst the soil is moist and the seedlings are established before the onset of summer.  Weed control in the first few years is important, lest they overwhelm and choke the new seedlings.  However, once established, the new trees will go on to dominate the area and establish fully into mature trees providing food and habitats for a range of animal species including our precious black cockatoo.

Areas being re-established with planting by the BCCC are important – known as peri-urban areas.  These are on the perimetre of suburbs and are the last frontier before birds hit the coastal plan and there are very feed and roosting sources.

Want to help out?  We need you!  Contact us and find out when the next activity/work day is.